Bailey and Potter, CPA

    We Work For the Employee

Email: info@job-rights.com

Telephone: 904-296-2328
Fax: 904-296-2341

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Our office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. After hours or on weekends or holidays you may leave a voice mail message for any of our staff or attorneys by calling (904) 396-2322.

Our fee arrangement for services depends on the case and cannot be determined until your situation is reviewed by the attorney. Although we do charge a fee for the initial consultation, our fee for this service is less than our usual and customary hourly rate. Currently, the fee charged for the initial consultation is between $85 and $125 per half hour, depending on the attorney.  Many of our cases can be accepted on a contingent fee basis so that no fee is paid unless there is a recovery.


overtime and minimum wage claims...

Overtime Pay

Unless specifically exempted, employees covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) must receive overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek at a rate not less than time and one-half their regular rates of pay. There is no limit on the number of hours employees aged 16 and older may work in any workweek..

It is not uncommon for some employers to improperly treat employees as exempt under the FLSA. Even though paid on a salary basis, this does not mean that overtime is not required. The lawyers at The Law Offices of Archibald J. Thomas, III, P.A. can usually determine if you are entitled to overtime compensation by reviewing and analyzing the duties and responsibilities of the job or position.

The FLSA applies on a workweek basis. An employee's workweek is a fixed and regularly recurring period of 168 hours -- seven consecutive 24-hour periods. It need not coincide with the calendar week, but may begin on any day and at any hour of the day. Different workweeks may be established for different employees or groups of employees. Averaging of hours over two or more weeks is not permitted. Normally, overtime pay earned in a particular workweek must be paid on the regular pay day for the pay period in which the wages were earned.

The regular rate of pay cannot be less than the minimum wage. The regular rate includes all remuneration for employment except certain payments excluded by the FLSA itself. Payments which are not part of the regular rate include pay for expenses incurred on the employer's behalf, premium payments for overtime work or the true premiums paid for work on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, discretionary bonuses, gifts and payments in the nature of gifts on special occasions, and payments for occasional periods when no work is performed due to vacation, holidays, or illness.
Earnings may be determined on a piece-rate, salary, commission, or some other basis, but in all such cases the overtime pay due must be computed on the basis of the average hourly rate derived from such earnings. This is calculated by dividing the total pay for employment (except for the statutory exclusions noted above) in any workweek by the total number of hours actually worked.

Where an employee in a single workweek works at two or more different types of work for which different straight-time rates have been established, the regular rate for that week is the weighted average of such rates. That is, the earnings from all such rates are added together and this total is then divided by the total number of hours worked at all jobs.

Where non-cash payments are made to employees in the form of goods or facilities, the reasonable cost to the employer or fair value of such goods or facilities must be included in the regular rate.

Typical Problems

Fixed Sum for Varying Amounts of Overtime: A lump sum paid for work performed during overtime hours without regard to the number of overtime hours worked does not qualify as an overtime premium even though the amount of money paid is equal to or greater than the sum owed on a per-hour basis. For example, no part of a flat sum of $180 to employees who work overtime on Sunday will qualify as an overtime premium, even though the employees' straight-time rate is $12.00 an hour and the employees always work less than 10 hours on Sunday. Similarly, where an agreement provides for 6 hours pay at $13.00 an hour regardless of the time actually spent for work on a job performed during overtime hours, the entire $78.00 must be included in determining the employees' regular rate.

Salary for Workweek Exceeding 40 Hours: A fixed salary for a regular workweek longer than 40 hours does not discharge FLSA statutory obligations. For example, an employee may be hired to work a 45 hour workweek for a weekly salary of $405. In this instance the regular rate is obtained by dividing the $405 straight-time salary by 45 hours, resulting in a regular rate of $9.00. The employee is then due additional overtime computed by multiplying the 5 overtime hours by one-half the regular rate of pay ($4.50 x 5 = $22.50).

Overtime Pay May Not Be Waived: The overtime requirement may not be waived by agreement between the employer and employees. An agreement that only 8 hours a day or only 40 hours a week will be counted as working time also fails the test of FLSA compliance. An announcement by the employer that no overtime work will be permitted, or that overtime work will not be paid for unless authorized in advance, also will not impair the employee's right to compensation for compensable overtime hours that are worked.

The overtime compensation lawyers at The Law Offices of Archibald J. Thomas, III, P.A. have handled cases involving overtime claims for numerous employees over the years, including those that have been improperly characterized as exempt employees under the FLSA. Please contact us if you have an overtime pay claim and need out assistance to recover the compensation owed by the employer.

Minimum Wage

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the federal minimum wage for covered nonexempt employees is $5.85 per hour effective July 24, 2007; $6.55 per hour effective July 24, 2008; and $7.25 per hour effective July 24, 2009. Many states, including Florida, also have minimum wage laws. Where an employee is subject to both the state and federal minimum wage laws, the employee is entitled to the higher minimum wage rate.

Various minimum wage exceptions apply under specific circumstances to workers with disabilities, full-time students, youth under age 20 in their first 90 consecutive calendar days of employment, tipped employees and student-learners.

Minimum wage for workers who receive tips
An employer may pay a tipped employee not less than $2.13 an hour in direct wages if that amount plus the tips received equal at least the federal minimum wage, the employee retains all tips and the employee customarily and regularly receives more than $30 a month in tips. If an employee's tips combined with the employer's direct wages of at least $2.13 an hour do not equal the federal minimum hourly wage, the employer must make up the difference.

Our minimum wage lawyers can evaluate any situation involving minimum wage law requirements and provide representation or advice. Please contact us if you have questions or need representation regarding minimum wage claims.

 


Our employment law attorneys represent employees throughout Florida and south and central Georgia, including the cities of: Orlando, Daytona Beach, Melbourne, Titusville, Naples, Ft. Meyers, Tampa, St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Sarasota, Gainesville, Jacksonville, Orange Park, St. Augustine, Port St. Lucie, Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Tallahassee, Lake City, Ocala, Pensacola, Atlanta, Brunswick, Savannah, and Kings Bay. Our employment lawyers also represent employees in the following counties: Duval County, St. Johns County, Alachua County, Clay County, Nassau County, Orange County, Hillsborough County, Pinellas County, Marion County, Volusia County, Brevard County, Polk County, Broward County, Fulton County, DeKalb County, Camden County, Chatham County and Glynn County. Whether you need a Florida overtime lawyer, Florida wrongful termination attorney, Florida discrimination lawyer or a Jacksonville retaliation case lawyer, we can help.

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